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20121120
20121120
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jazeera reporting that the ceasefire is going to be announced this evening in cairo. now egypt will reportedly be agreeing to oversee this plan which is said to include an easing of the crossroads into gaza. so peace appears to be eminent but what do you make of the transparency of what the outline of it deal is? >> well, i think we still need to see it implemented. having spent a lot of time in the middle east, done a lot of negotiations, one thing i know about this part of the world, nothing is concluded until you actually see it carried out. it's one thing to talk about it. it's something else to do it. so let's actually see the ceasefire take hold. what i'm hearing is that by midnight their time, which would be around 5:00 our time, that's when it might actually take hold. so if it does, that will be the first step. then the question will be how real is it, number one. number two, what are its real elements? if there is some easing of movement into gaza, what are the commitments that hamas is undertaking to ensure there will not only be no fire out of gaza but also is there
at the presidential palace in egypt who assured me there was no announcement yet to be made from the presidential palace regarding a truce agreement. he gave me a simple explanation. the president's sister passed away in egypt, still at the funeral and with family. he was not expected to be back in cairo to make an announcem t announcement. it was something that would probably come out of the egyptian intelligence service which has been negotiating intensity. egypt's president mohamed morsi is from the muslim brother hood. it's unlike he he has been involved in negotiations with the israeli side. the only people that could negotiate between the israelis and meet with hamas and other palestinian factions are probably the intelligence agencies there. that's where we understand the negotiations to still be ongoing. there's an outlined agreement, but nobody has signed the paper. that's why i think people here are still very apprehensive this could be the final hurdle. you're talking about the presence or the arrival of u.s. secretary of state hillary clinton. there is no doubt the u.s. can play a ve
clinton heading into the region at this hour. she's going to be meting with leaders in israel, in egypt, in ramallah, that's going to start tomorrow. the israelis carrying out more than 80 air strikes overnight. 95 rockets back across the border. 38 palestinians killed in the last 24 hours. cnn has the conflict covered from all sides. christiane amanpour is live in jerusalem, arwa damon is on the ground in gaza city, richard plight again is in ashkelon in israel, jessica yellin is live in cambodia where secretary clinton has departed heading for the middle east. we begin with christiane. welcome. give us a sense of this new announcement from israel. how long do you think israel is waiting to silt on this halt before it would move forward with sending ground troops in? >> well, what was reported was that a senior government official in the loop close to the talks has confirmed to me this morning that after the latest intense round of conversations and meetings between prime minister netanyahu and his inner security cabinet, which went on into the early morning hours here jerusalem time,
with benjamin netanyahu and then to ramallah to meet with palestinian leaders and finally to cairo, egypt. the president was up late last night talking to netanyahu and mohamed morrissey. this morning chuck asked ben rhodes whether clinton is going because talks are stuck or a diplomatic resolution is close at hand. >> she is going because we've been in discussions with these leaders and we want to carry those forward. and obviously the center of gravity for those discussions is in the region. i don't want to predict what the outcome of those discussions will be. we know how difficult the situation is, how charged the issue of gaza is. we've seen conflict there in the past. so this is a difficult challenge. but, again, it's worth the effort of leaders from the united states in the region and interfashionly. >> chuck joins us now from cambodia where he is traveling with the president. chuck, a lot of moving and fast moving parts here. what can you tell us? what's the latest? >> i can tell you what aides will say in answer it to that question off answer. certain things you can say on camera
that have had profound effects. to explain how, let me take a detour to the arab spring. in egypt last year, when the government shut down the internet and shut down mobile service, many asked, how are they able to do that? what does it mean that they can do that? it is a very important question. let me focus on another important question that fewer people asked. how did egypt come to have an internet and a mobile service worth shutting down? the short answer lies in the most important policy accomplishment of the clinton administration that most people have never heard of. the world trade organization the agreement. monopolies 1990's, operated communication networks in most companies -- countries around world. generally, the government owns the monopolies. it was before the internet and mobile command occasions took off. it is not a coincidence that the end of that world coincided with the takeoff of mobile and internet. back in the 1990's, leaders at the white house and the state department, the commerce department, and the fcc, developed what many thought at the time was a crazy and cert
Search Results 0 to 4 of about 5